It's Official - my '51 OTCA project

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mmmalmberg

mmmalmberg

LOVES Wooden Canoes
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So far so good on canvas...
 
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mmmalmberg

mmmalmberg

LOVES Wooden Canoes
I elected to go with stainless staples, against my natural inclination, after reading about old rib tips splitting up from tacks. That made sense. What I found I don't like about staples is they cut through the canvas rather than wedging between fibers. So if/when you are pulling staples and re-stapling, the canvas suffers a bit of abuse. Other than that, hard to beat the convenience of an electric stapler. Even in consideration of the unbelievable wimpiness of the Stanley stapler I bought.
 
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mmmalmberg

mmmalmberg

LOVES Wooden Canoes
Both ends buttoned up, two coats of primer went on yesterday.

Primer is already quite dry to touch, to the point I was able to lightly sand with 220 to knock down any peach fuzz. Only problems are some holes up near the tips where I temporarily stapled the canvas to keep it stretched while tacking the stems. Would not recommend anyone to use staples for this purpose, they tear up the canvas and leave holes when you pull them.
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mmmalmberg

mmmalmberg

LOVES Wooden Canoes
Staple damage. Was unsure whether to worry about these; went ahead and did filler over them but they kind of puff up fibers through the filler. Should probably have sewn or glued in some kind of repair...
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MGC

Scrapmaker
Your filler should have filled those holes and also filled the weave. You should be able to dredge a bit of the filler from the bottom of the can where it's always thick like mud and use it on the seams and any other holes...and then wait. You need to let it sit for at least 5 or 6 weeks and likely more before you can do anything else to the hull.
 
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mmmalmberg

mmmalmberg

LOVES Wooden Canoes
Yeah the filler filled them but the frayed edges don't lie flat. I've got them under control I think. We're in pretty warm weather so I'm hoping for a quicker drying/cure time. I'm hoping I can flip it to do varnish work inside in maybe a week?
 
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mmmalmberg

mmmalmberg

LOVES Wooden Canoes
A couple of tools that have been useful. First a large slightly flexible sanding block from a local auto paint store. Just enough give to be useful on canoe curves, they sell rolls (not cheap) of adhesive sandpaper - in this case 60 grit.
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mmmalmberg

mmmalmberg

LOVES Wooden Canoes
Have spread the filler application out over a few days. First day was two coats of filler worked in with an orbital sander (with canvas over the pad). That worked great, although I do think it was bringing up some additional fibers from the weave. But it did leave a very flat and apparently filled canvas surface, using about 4/5ths of the gallon. I skimmed a partial third coat onto the canoe by brushing and then using a flexible stainless "rib" from a ceramic supply shop to sort of trowel the paint over the hull, filling the lows somewhat effectively.
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Blott

LOVES Wooden Canoes
Whats wrong with my workshop? :)

I was thinking staples too but like the authentic approach of tacks. Me with an electric staple gun would end up with a Beagle stuck to the rafters by his ears!
 

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mmmalmberg

mmmalmberg

LOVES Wooden Canoes
Whats wrong with my workshop? :)

I was thinking staples too but like the authentic approach of tacks. Me with an electric staple gun would end up with a Beagle stuck to the rafters by his ears!
I'd have used tacks but was concerned with splitting up the rib tips, many of which had splits and other injuries already. The staples were fine everywhere except when I used them to temporarily maintain the lengthwise stretch near the tips, into the planking, when cutting the boat loose from the stretch. Tacks would have been better there.
 
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mmmalmberg

mmmalmberg

LOVES Wooden Canoes
I wish I a looked at this threat before I had started working on my grandfather canoe. I think I can still get it all together.
Hang in there. Patience is the best power tool for canoe work. And it needn't be perfect, mostly just needs to float without falling apart:)
 

Bob Stallard

New Member
Thanks for your encouraging words. I had in 1972 replace six ribs, a number of planks, and recanvas it. Now after another 48 years, it needs more work, though I have more time to do it.
Do you know someone in the Hamilton, MA area who I could talk to?
 
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