Help support the WCHA Forums by making a tax-deductible donation!

how long do you dry ribs

Discussion in 'Tips and Tricks' started by Treewater, Jul 6, 2013.

  1. Treewater

    Treewater Wooden Canoes are in the Blood

    I actually have two concerns. I have just done ribs in my 1938 Octa.
    After trial and error I finally decided to steam the ribs and wait one hour then fasten them in place. This allows for a "wet rib" placement and seems to contour better.
    The other problem is how to get the proper contour to a multiple rib replacement. I guess we all know that replacing one or two ribs is easy since the adjacent ribs and planking sort of mold the new rib into shape with a little force. However, I had seven ribs in a row to replace, extensive planking damage, and I ending up fastening several pieces of wood to the outside in order to get the new ribs to be even. I had to put screws through several ribs thus weakening them but I saw no other way. Any advice?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Mark Adams

    Mark Adams all wood nut

    It looks and sounds like you are doing everything right. I am working on a 25' war canoe right now, and the ribs are dry, and good to go by the next day. Granted, the canoe is outside, in the sun, and the humidity is about 8%!!

    In higher humidity, I waited a couple of days before I did anything too exciting.
     
  3. Dan Lindberg

    Dan Lindberg Ex Wood Hoarder

    After a couple mis-steps, I only remove/replace every other rib when there is a bunch in a row.
    Or maybe every 3rd if there is more than a bunch.

    I also got burned putting them in "wet", so I let them sit overnight before fitting them.

    Dan
     
  4. Dave Wermuth

    Dave Wermuth Who hid my paddle?

    right track I think

    here's what I did to make something out of nothing. I used more battens. but I think you are on the right track. The Pete Flat back came out quite fair.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. OP
    OP
    Treewater

    Treewater Wooden Canoes are in the Blood

    Okay. Thanks You all. I wasn't crazy to add the outside battens. In fact, the more the better and I did consider straps instead of screws. I'll see how those wet wood ribs come out. What did you mean Dan that you got "burned." By the way, since the pros are selling bronze clinching irons someone is putting in wet ribs.
     
  6. Dan Lindberg

    Dan Lindberg Ex Wood Hoarder

    I put some in wet, and when they dried, they no longer were tight to the ribs.

    My process now, based on much discussion and reading on the site, is to very carefully measure and mark where to both install and bend the ribs, bend them over the outside, let dry overnight, install the next night, tacking from the center of the rib to the rails. Once I started following this, my ribs come out just fine.

    Dan
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Treewater

    Treewater Wooden Canoes are in the Blood

    recycled and wet ribs

    Based on the comments I just put in the last of 17 ribs in my Octa.
    As Dan said, putting in wet ribs they may shrink and be loose when dry. So I clamped them in place wet instead of nailing them and maybe I'll just push them down a little further to nail. When I get back to this project in a month I'll know if I'm right.
    If no one has tried it, the second new rib in the photo is the identical rib from a scrap 18' 1937 HW. I had to soak the rib to straighten it then steam it but it sure slipped in nice and conforms well. I posted already taking that HW apart. So a burn pile canoe gets a second life, or at least part of it.
    And yes, replacing one rib at a time when a row is damaged is the best idea but my problem was extensive damage where the seven ribs in a row were distorting the hull and adjacent ribs. That photo of Dave's shows the best way of dealing with a badly damaged canoe.
    That pistol grip clamp and a rubber mallet make good work getting the rib in place.
     

    Attached Files:

Share This Page