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Hello from Paris, france

Discussion in 'Guestbook' started by ansrick, May 31, 2013.

  1. ansrick

    ansrick Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Hello paddlers

    Last year I've been told about the WCHA. I've waited a long time before registering.

    I've bought a canvas Peterborough and am looking for informations about it. I'll post picture of it when I'll have learned how to.
    In France we very seldom meet wooden canoes on rivers. I've been kayakist for ten years and have never met any.

    For those who speak french, we're opening an new forum about wooden canoes (in france) : forum Canoë Bois.

    I hope I'll be courageous enough to read you in english to learn the many things I need to know.
    Quite proud to become a member of this forum!

    hans
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2013
  2. Bill TRAPPEUR

    Bill TRAPPEUR Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Welcome to the forum WCHA Hansrick, you took me of speed to make known your new site here.
    Good reading of the various posts
     
  3. OP
    OP
    ansrick

    ansrick Curious about Wooden Canoes

    4,47 m * 97,5 cm (89 à inside), depth : 33 cm

    I've been to Drangonfly but couldn't manage to identify this boat. Didn't know how to do. May be I didn't understand english.

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    Last edited: May 31, 2013
  4. Dick Persson

    Dick Persson Canoe builder & restorer

    Welcome to WCHA Hans.

    Is it possible that the overall length of your canoe is 15 feet (4.57 m) and its width 36 inches (91.44 cm) measured to the outside hull not including the gunnel?

    If so it is most likely an early Peterborough “Trapper”, model # 90 built sometime between 1909 and 1914.

    Dick Persson
    Buckhorn Canoe Company
    www.buckhorncanoes.com
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2013
  5. OP
    OP
    ansrick

    ansrick Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Thank you Dick

    No it is 14,6 feet long or I mistook when measuring. I'll check it again.

    Could you please help me know how to measure a boat in order to identify it ?

    Width : inside / outside the gunwales ? at the widest width if wider than gunwales ?
    Length : at the top of bow and stem / at the longest length (if bow and stem are shorter) ?
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2013
  6. Dick Persson

    Dick Persson Canoe builder & restorer

    Hi Hans,

    Length is measured in a straight line between the extreme points on the outside of the canoe.
    Width is measured at the canoes widest point at the outside of the hull (not including the gunnels).
    Depth from the top of the gunnels to the outside hull bottom at the canoe midships.

    See sketch below.

    Dick Persson
    Buckhorn Canoe Company
     

    Attached Files:

  7. OP
    OP
    ansrick

    ansrick Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Thank you Dick

    So I'll have to do it again. That'll change a little bit.
    Would the thwart tag be a help to think about dates?
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2013
  8. OP
    OP
    ansrick

    ansrick Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Hi

    For those who speak French, a website about wooden canoes in France Héritage Canoë Bois.
    About boats, construction, literature, history...
     
  9. OP
    OP
    ansrick

    ansrick Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Hello

    Just bought a new one today by that beautiful day. Hopping she's Canadian...
    Don't have measured yet.

    I've never restored a wood and canvas. I've done it on all-wood.
    In France, there's no store selling canvas for canoes. I'll have to buy it in a cloth store. So which specifications for the canvas please ?
    Would you keep all those little keels under the hull or prefer to remove them ?

    cano%u0025C3%u0025AB-entoil%u0025C3%u0025A9-heritage-canoe-bois.jpg cano%u0025C3%u0025AB-entoil%u0025C3%u0025A9-heritage-canoe-bois.jpg cano%u0025C3%u0025AB-entoil%u0025C3%u0025A9-heritage-canoe-bois.jpg cano%u0025C3%u0025AB-entoil%u0025C3%u0025A9-heritage-canoe-bois.jpg cano%u0025C3%u0025AB-entoil%u0025C3%u0025A9-heritage-canoe-bois.jpg cano%u0025C3%u0025AB-entoil%u0025C3%u0025A9-heritage-canoe-bois.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2015
  10. OP
    OP
    ansrick

    ansrick Curious about Wooden Canoes

  11. OP
    OP
    ansrick

    ansrick Curious about Wooden Canoes

    She's not home so I can't have her dimensions now. Could you tell me which builder(s) it could be so that I look for informations in the right direction, please ?

    Would you keep all the out false keels or would you remove them ?
     
  12. Larry Meyer

    Larry Meyer Wooden Canoes are in the Blood

    It certainly could be Canadian, one of the many models made by the Chestnut Canoe company.

    The mast step could be original but the two long battens on the interior floor and the many superfluous keel strips on the bottom of the hull are almost certainly not original. In fact I have never seen a wood canvas canoe thus modified. It suggests someone’s idea of a way to stiffen the hull and protect the bottom from very rough waterways.
     
  13. Greg Nolan

    Greg Nolan enthusiast

    I suspect that the wear strips were added to the bottom, not to protect against rough waterways, but to protect the bottom when the boat was pulled onto a rocky home beach -- and judging from the paint wear, such protection may have been necessary if the canoe was used in that fashion. If you are planning to use your canoe more gently, and to carry it onto the shore rather than dragging it, there would be no dwonside to removing the wear strips, and you would certainly get a lighter canoe.
     
  14. Andre Cloutier

    Andre Cloutier Firestarter. Wicked Firestarter.

    The strips look like they were put on with tacks or small clench nails, they will need to come off of course to canvas the canoe but you will want to go very slowly if so as they will want to tear out of the ribs. I would think you would have luck in grinding off the heads and pushing the body up through the ribs, in which case they shouldnt ruin the rib or look too bad. The boat looks like it might be one of the Canadian Canoe Co. models, rather than Chestnut. They used the square seat spacers on the bolts early on, and the ribs dont have any taper. The half ribs are unusual for a Canadian boat, but it looks in fine shape.
    Andre
     
  15. OP
    OP
    ansrick

    ansrick Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Thank you for your answers.

    She looks like a Chestnut, a Peterborough, a Canadian Canoe Co. I think those companies worked together, that's why boats where similar.
    I'll come back to you when I have measured her.

    About the wear strips : Canadian boats imported in France were equipped with those strips because here in Europe, rivers are smaller than in America, so "rockier". The boats had to be well protected. Many Lakefields, Peterboroughs, Chestnuts imported have those strips in France.
     

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