Glue Best For Canvas Repairs On Old Chestnut. Thanx.

OP
OP
J

joeswayze44

Curious about Wooden Canoes
thanx benson. yes, i used ambroid in the old days. will check wcha thread on subject. aside from work on canvas, i have thoughts of running a bead of glue along both sides of keel on this little chestnut (bob special) i just inherited. stored for last 30 years in barn. structurally great, but also original canvas from '50s, so far from perfect. thanx
 

Benson Gray

Canoe History Enthusiast
Staff member
A fresh coat of paint might be a better option. If that doesn't fix the leaks then it is probably time for a new canvas. Good luck,

Benson
 

Dave Osborn

LIFE MEMBER
Joe,
If it were mine, rather than laying a bead of glue along the keel, I’d remove it and re-bed it.
Doesn’t take that long to do...
 
OP
OP
J

joeswayze44

Curious about Wooden Canoes
yikes. removing the keel makes me anxious, given my limited skills. but no doubt this is very good advice. thanx. btw,this canoe has a serial number. might the wcha have the chestnut directory with canoes listed by serial number? if not the wcha, who? with thanx.
 

Benson Gray

Canoe History Enthusiast
Staff member
this canoe has a serial number. might the wcha have the chestnut directory with canoes listed by serial number? if not the wcha, who?

There aren't any extensive Chestnut serial number records available like there are for some other builders so no one here can tell you much more about the specific history of this canoe. Sorry,

Benson
 
OP
OP
J

joeswayze44

Curious about Wooden Canoes
well, the precise history of this little Bob Special will have to remain a mystery. so be it. :) thanx, joe
 

David Satter

Wooden Canoe Maniac
Anybody know of the shelf life. I've got about a dozen tubes of Ambroid . I've had them for about 6 to 8 years. They all seem fine and not hardened. I know they still work on my work gloves. I don't think I'm ever going to use 12 tubes. I'd hate to see them go bad. I use a lot of G-flex epoxy from Jamestown Dist. The metal tubes always seem to crack before you use it all up like the Ambroid tubes.
 

Greg Nolan

enthusiast
I've got a couple of tubes that are several years old, and I would guess that they are good as long as the stuff stays liquid. It is essentially cellulose nitrate dissolved in a solvent that is basically acetone. As far as I can tell, it is a glue that dries, rather than curing, and it seems to work as long as the solvent is present.

It is far from the strongest glue around, but it is fine for patching a tear in a canoe's canvas, because it dries rapidly, is a bit flexible, and is waterproof (or for gluing plastic model airplanes together where it gets its strength by actually melting the plastic, creating a welded joint when the acetone dries off.)

The history of Ambroid can be found at http://www.ottertooth.com/Canoe_pages/ambroid.htm, where it is reported that " Old-timers have told the Ambroid Company that it lasts for decades in the tubes."

As far as I know, it is no longer made -- but Devcon's Duco cement seems to be almost identical.
 
Top