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Wish information about old canoe

Discussion in 'Serial Number Search' started by WHC, Aug 3, 2019.

  1. WHC

    WHC New Member

    I would like to know who made and how old is canoe with this making stenciled on the inside keel:

    A 233 35 16

    No other identifying features are apparent

    Thanks very much.

    WHC
     
  2. mccloud

    mccloud Wooden Canoe Maniac

    That's scant information. We like photos. Please post profile, stem, overall, decks and the stencil. What is the construction of the canoe? Traditional wood/canvas? There is some similarity between that numbering sequence and White, which often used 16, the length, 35, the year of build, and the number.
     
  3. Benson Gray

    Benson Gray Canoe History Enthusiast Staff Member

    I agree with Tom McCloud that pictures and more details could help. Some Robertson canoes have shown up with a format like this. See http://www.wcha.org/forums/index.php?threads/624/ and http://www.wcha.org/forums/index.php?threads/14178/ for some similar examples. There are no known serial number records for Robertson canoes so we lack the detailed information available for some other builders. The 'outline' font of a Robertson number is distinctly different from the more traditional font of a White number. See http://www.wcha.org/forums/index.php?threads/6482/ for an example of a White serial number.

    Benson
     
  4. Michael Grace

    Michael Grace Lifetime Member

    Agreed with Benson - this serial number format sounds like it's from the Charles River area. I've got a couple with this serial number format. Neither has a maker's mark of any kind that I've been able to find, but they are clearly from the Charles River area around and upstream of Boston.

    Even though ours have no maker's marks, as Benson indicated, there are some canoes with this serial number format that have two different kinds of Robertson marks: deck tag and/or the Robertson name stamped into the ends of the thwarts.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2019
  5. OP
    OP
    WHC

    WHC New Member

    I will gladly supply photos if I can figure out how to do it. I am brand new at this. Can't seem to make the photos smaller. The photos appears and then I get an error message saying it is too large and then it disappears?
    WHC
     
  6. OP
    OP
    WHC

    WHC New Member

    Finally figured how to get these on. Very convoluted. Hope you can expand then to full image?
    WHC

    IMG_0777.jpeg IMG_0776.jpeg IMG_0779.jpeg IMG_0774.jpeg
     
  7. Rob Stevens

    Rob Stevens Wooden Canoes are in the Blood

    Those beautiful kneeling thwarts are often found on Charles River builders canoes.
     
  8. mccloud

    mccloud Wooden Canoe Maniac

    It seems certain that this canoe is not a White. A very nice looking canoe it is. You have what is termed a 'closed gunwale' canoe - note the strip of wood entirely along the top of the gunwales. Most manufacturers discontinued this by the 1920's in favor of ' open gunwale' construction, so my guess that the 35 stamped on the stem was the year of the build is almost certainly wrong.
     
  9. smallboatshop

    smallboatshop Restorers

  10. Benson Gray

    Benson Gray Canoe History Enthusiast Staff Member

    Last edited: Aug 5, 2019
  11. JClearwater

    JClearwater Wooden Canoe Maniac

    WHC,

    You haven't said how long your canoe is but Crandell only made one model. It was called the "Lake Quinsigamond" model 17' long. It had 'normal' caned seats. Your canoe has kneeling thwarts like Robertson made. John Robertson was Crandall's father-in-law and they worked together for a while at least. They both used the same three lobe deck style that your canoe has. Crandell died in 1924. Robertson died 1935 I think. There is more information about both of them here on the forums.

    You have a very nice canoe.

    Jim
     

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