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Tremblay 1970 (new To Canoes)

Discussion in 'Wood and Canvas' started by Blair Charbonneau, Mar 27, 2018.

  1. Blair Charbonneau

    Blair Charbonneau New Member

    Hello

    New to canoes and I have a few questions.
    I love the look of the old wood canoes. I have found one for sale and at a good price. Or so I am thinking.

    Anyway it's covered in Verolite and Im just wondering if there is a way to sort of restore it or paint over it to bring back some longevity to the canoe. As is the canoe floats and there are a few scratches that have been patches on it.

    I'm not really sure what Verolite is and I'm also wondering if maybe a newer modern canoe is something worth getting instead.

    Please let me know your thoughts on this guys. I'm looking forward to get into canoeing more so any tips and information will help a lot thanks !!
     
  2. Pook

    Pook Chestnut Canoe fan

    Blair,
    If you like old wooden canoes, then a newer modern canoe just won't cut it!
    ( Ask me how I know...)

    With respect to the canoe in question, if it is in decent shape and usable for a couple of seasons you might want to consider it as is. Tremblay's were decent but not particularly well made and therefore not really collectors items. That might factor into your rerstoration.

    For most things related to do- it- yourself wood canvas canoe repairs I refer to Mike Elliott. Check this out:

    https://canoeguybc.wordpress.com/2017/07/02/a-restorers-guide-to-tremblay-wood-canvas-canoes/

    And especially his note about verolite:

    One more note:
    In the later years of production, Tremblay canoes were known for their use of vinyl impregnated canvas (Verolite). Although a couple of canoe builders still use this material, I have yet to find a single canoe restorer who will touch the stuff. The vinyl coating acts as a plastic bag wrapped around the canoe and effectively holds water against the hull for extended periods of time. This lack of ‘breathing’ in the canvas cover results in extensive rot through many (if not most) Tremblay canoes that were paddled on a regular basis

    Good Luck!
    Bruce
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2018
  3. Andre Cloutier

    Andre Cloutier Firestarter

    recommend you take some photos and post them here for a quick survey. Verolite is a terrible product for canoes that contributed significantly to rot as compared to canvas and traditional filler. I've sent a few Tremblays to the burn pile , and when stored upside down they typically rot the rib tips and/or gunwales, making repairs mostly not worth the effort due to material selection and build quality. that being said, if its in good condition they paddle just fine. Regardless of the condition, wood canoes and boats in general arent that much work to maintain if kept out of sun, rain and snow. Nothing can be done to restore the finish if its faded or weather damaged.
     

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