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traditional cedar strip question

Discussion in 'Traditional All-Wood Construction' started by samb, Jun 19, 2017.

  1. samb

    samb LOVES Wooden Canoes

    It’s all just thinks and thoughts at present but .....

    On a traditional cedar strip, what is the joint used between the keelson and the stems?

    Why would I not make the keelson and stems all from one piece, router the rib slots first on the main middle length, fix in place, then ‘boil in the bag’ steam the ends down over the form?

    Thanks
    Sam
     
  2. Rollin Thurlow

    Rollin Thurlow member since 1980

    There is a very high chance of the prenotched stem breaking or splitting or being deformed at one of the notches when it is bent.
    That would be a heck of a lot of work down the drain if that happened!
    Rollin
     
  3. OP
    OP
    samb

    samb LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Thanks for that thought Rollin. I have considered this, but after nearly completing the mould, I can see the bend doesn't start until well after the cant ribs start - and these would be notched out after bending.

    The real advantage I see at present in doing it in parts is the length of timber needed - far easier to find the right grain in shorter lengths.

    I'll need to decide in about two weeks.

    Sam
     
  4. alick burt

    alick burt LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Hi sam
    You could always laminate your stems and keelson and make the groove in the lamination by making one strip of the laminate narrower than not exactly traditional as you would have to use some of that infernal glue stuff these modern folks keep going on about but it would be strong.

    Alick
     
  5. OP
    OP
    samb

    samb LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Well I could, but. . . . Nah!!
     
  6. OP
    OP
    samb

    samb LOVES Wooden Canoes

    The answer is that the stem needs to be thicker wood to be able to get the shape where the change from flat keel line round to v-shaped stem occurs, so separate stems and keelson are necessary. Without the extra thickness, you wouldn't be left with enough timber to fix the cant ribs (if that's what they are called on these boats) . . . . so despite following Rollins wise words and doing it in pieces, I have then also followed Alicks words and laminated an extra 1/2" to get the thickness needed.

    Sam
     
    alick burt likes this.
  7. gauridollar

    gauridollar New Member

    Hello, such a nice forum!!! I really appreciate your forum. I am new to join it.
    Thank you
     

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