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Thompson canoe

Discussion in 'Traditional All-Wood Construction' started by canoerich, Jan 5, 2006.

  1. canoerich

    canoerich canoerich

    9 ribs are needing repair in the mid section of this canoe, I have removed 4, not in sucession, the left side is out of shape and I do have a batten in place but the shape is not correct. Also there are no ribs close to the broken ones that I can use to shape the new ribs.
     
  2. OP
    OP
    canoerich

    canoerich canoerich

    back to the canoe needing 9 ribs. placed supports on the inside to draw canoe back to shape, bent 4 ribs none broke. Then I removed the top planking in order to get the ribs inside the canoe, worked very well. Each rib went between the inwale and the planking into the canoe and up though the other side between the planking and the inwale, worked very well. I had taken the trim from around the floor so the rids fit inplace and have tacked each rib into the canoe, easy and fast.
    I am looking for longer tacks to go though the planking ribs and the trim, any ideas?
     
  3. Dave Osborn

    Dave Osborn LIFE MEMBER

  4. OP
    OP
    canoerich

    canoerich canoerich

    canoerich

    Dave, looks like the stem to me in you response, the trim I have is football shaped and runs on inside of the canoe on top of the ribs extending out to the ends of the half ribs from bow to stern. I guess screws would work?
     
  5. Dave Osborn

    Dave Osborn LIFE MEMBER

    Rich,
    That is the linear trim strip that covers the ends of the full width half ribs that you see on an early Thompson Hiawatha. On mine, the original strip was similar to what is photographed......Maybe 5/8" wide, flat with rounded edges and about 3/16" thick. The replacements that I made were of white oak. Then I countersunk holes sacreligiously(sp?) fastened them with 3/8" phillips head screws. Not original, but it worked.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    canoerich

    canoerich canoerich

    after looking at the image I now see what you did, I am slow these days. Looks good and I will consider this method. Thanks:)
     
  7. martin ferwerda

    martin ferwerda LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Rich,
    I have one of the old Thompson Hiawatha forms. For what it is worth, I have been using 7/8" brass canoe tacks to attach the stringers that run along the bilge of these canoes. The planking is 3/16", the ribs are 5/16" and the stringer is roughly 3/16 to 5/16" thick, so you have about 3/4" of thickness when tacking from the outside planking through the stringer. I drill small pilot holes before pounding in the tack, which clinches when it hits the metal strip at the bottom of the slot in the form where these stringers sit when the canoe is being built. For the most part the tacks clinch OK, I use cherry, so it is a softer wood than oak. Dave's solution is also a viable one.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    canoerich

    canoerich canoerich

    Martin, Thanks for the info, I have contacted Rollin and he is providing the tacks. This canoe was painted dark green with orange triangles at the stems and under the out wale, have you painted any of your canoes with the orange, if yes what paint do you use?
    Richard
     
  9. martin ferwerda

    martin ferwerda LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Sounds like you have a canoe with the Thompson design number 3. As far as paints go, on canoes I sell, I have used Interlux Brightside and Kirby paints. On my personal canoes, I have also used plain deck and porch enamel (Benjamin Moore). They all seem to hold up well, the deck and porch enamel is harder and resists scratches better that the marine enamels, but I would guess it is also less flexible, although I have not had any problems with it. I have tried a couple with fancy paint jobs, it is a bit of work to get the color depth in the designs as it takes mutliple coats.
     

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  10. OP
    OP
    canoerich

    canoerich canoerich

    Martin, Thanks, on the deck there is a stained area where a deck plate was nailed, it is missing, any ideas where I can find one? This canoe is in Ok shape, 9 ribs need replaced, some planking and the outside stems. And of course the inside needs stripping and the canvas needs replacement. Hope to have done by Assembly.
    Thanks again for your help, Richard
     
  11. Dave Osborn

    Dave Osborn LIFE MEMBER

    I would think it would be somewhat difficult to clinch a tack on the strips without being on the form........Do you agree Martin?
    That's why I did it from the the inside.
    Dave
     
  12. Dave Osborn

    Dave Osborn LIFE MEMBER

    Metal Tags

    Rich,
    I could be wrong, but I believe at one time a guy in Michigan had some original metal tags for Thompson. His name was Russ Hicks. His contact info is on the members list. Another resource may be Andreas Rhude. His contact info is also on the members list. Andreas is the foremost authority on Thompson Bros. Boat Company and may know of some tags floating around.
    Good Luck!!
    Dave
     
  13. martin ferwerda

    martin ferwerda LOVES Wooden Canoes

    The form is nice in that it holds the stringers neatly in place, and a after tacking the ribs to the stringer, the stringer does a neat job of holding the ribs in place, no need for temporary strips to keep the ribs in line.

    Not sure how well the tack will clinch if the stringer is oak, but if the clinching iron is solidly backing it, I would think it would work okay. It would be good to mark a line on the outside of the planking to know where to tack, and to get the stringer held in place somehow, so it is not flopping around while trying to fasten it down, but I do not think it would be that much worse than installing half ribs after a canoe is off the form.
     

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