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Size of strips for stripper

Discussion in 'Traditional All-Wood Construction' started by Nippersink, Nov 14, 2004.

  1. Nippersink

    Nippersink Nippersink

    Spending the last several days thinking about canoes, and a considering a winter not as fully scheduled as I'd like, I've decided to get a start on building a canoe...if I can come by materials on the cheap.

    I haven't picked up any books/plans yet, but I see guys selling cove and bead strips 3/4" or 7/8".

    I suppose it may not much matter how wide the strips are? The reason I ask this is because I may be abe to swing a deal. A fellow I did some work for has yet to make payment. Good guy, I just haven't told him what he owes me.

    Thing is, if my recollection is correct he has a lot of cedar timber in a pole barn. ..with no actual plans for. I'm certain its all very long and perhaps 6-8 inches wide. It's somewhere between 7/4 and 9/4 thick. I would think its all face grain.

    Whatta ya all say?

    Thanks guys, Chris
     
  2. Woodchuck

    Woodchuck Woodworker

    Strip size...

    Hi Chris, I share your same concern but it really doesn't make much difference whether they are 7/8" or 3/4" as the wider one will be a little harder to shape but not significantly. Just be consistant. Another way to look at is when 7/8" strip is inserted into another strip, there is only 3/4" exposed as the cove hides the bead and takes up 1/8". A good thing to think about when making accent strips, eh?

    As for the lumber! That stuff is getting really hard to find and it has a way of getting is expensive as soon as someone finds out that you need canoe grade. They tend to try and rip you off. I have been trying to find local suppliers with very little luck and at this point, it makes more sense to buy the completed strips. I can't save that much by making my own which I would prefer to do just because I want to say I made them. Maybe that's stupid but I have the tools and router bits and it hurts a little to have to buy something like milled strips.

    If the lumber is as you think and can provide straight edge grain strips when re-sawed, I sure would be interested as well. I live in the Detroit area and I noticed you are over and up in Illinois so I suspect you will have the same problem I have in findnig a source. I found a source for beautiful redwood but I want to stick to WRC for my Nomad. I can resaw and there would be alot of waste material but I would sure check it out and if it is good and you have enough, let me know... Thanks, Joe
     
  3. Dan Lindberg

    Dan Lindberg Ex Wood Hoarder

    Chris,

    It doesn't much matter which way the grain is in the "raw stock", as long as it's reasonably good grain, ie, tight and straight, and few knots.

    When you rip it into strips, you can cut it such that the strips are edge grain, sometimes it just takes a bit more work.

    Another comment, here in MN many/most builders don't use the B+C edges, but just square cut instead. With a little work with a small hand plane the strips can be fitted tight.

    As for strip width, boats have been made with strips ranging from 2" to 1/2" (and probably more), wide is fine on the sides, narrow better/desired in the chine.

    I usually get my raw stock from a local lumber yard that carries Aye grade cedar to 20', (and A redwood to 20' also) it's expensive but nice wood.

    Dan
     

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