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Shaping Sponson Ends Delema

Discussion in 'Wood and Canvas' started by thechief, Feb 25, 2018.

  1. thechief

    thechief Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    I just got done canvassing 1 sponson I didn't realize I messed up. All went well until I was done. When I was cleaning up and finally stepped back to look at my work did I realized that I didn't carry the upsweep shape of the bottom at each end. I was thinking about cutting and reshaping. Needless to say that might not be a good idea . Any of you guys think I can salvage the shape as I move along in the process?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. OP
    OP
    thechief

    thechief Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    I have a less aesthetic question about the visual appearance of the upsweeped ends of the sponsons .
    Construction wise and most importantly waterproof . Is it totally unaviasable to trim the bottom edge of the canvas? I could achieve the results I want by doing this. That or attempt to shape after the canvas is filled with a fairing compound
     
  3. OP
    OP
    thechief

    thechief Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Problem rectified ,thanks Gil
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Tony Muer

    Tony Muer Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Chief I’m new to association. I’m beginning to restore ‘38 Otca and would like to pick the forums collective brain on a couple of questions I have. For example what is the best method of preparing this old girls planking before recanvasing? Any insight would be appreciated.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    thechief

    thechief Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Hi Tony, I'm a new member as well and restoring my 2nd canoe right now.are you interested in what to to with the exterior planking, replacing sections or preparation before recanvasing.if there are no repair needed I make a 50/50 mix of lincead oil and wood turpentine and liberally apply to all eaxposted wood inside and out. The inside should be stripped first. You'd be suprised how the wood sucks it up. This feed the old dry wood and restores and helps preserve.
     
  6. Tony Muer

    Tony Muer Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Thanks for getting back to me chief. I’m in the process of stripping and sanding right now and have some minor repair issues to tackle before I prepare to canvas. Do you apply this mixture inside and out and I have read that some small amount of varnish should be added to the mix. I’m thinking of applying a light color stain on the inner ribs and planks. Should I stain before applying linseed mix? I’m thinking that maybe without varnish in mix I could stain after applying. One last question, is one coat sufficient or are two better. I guess that wasn’t the last question because I’m also wondering about whether or not the outside hull needs to be faired out with a compound and sanded or just go forward with the canvas over the linseed application? The hull itself looks pretty smooth as is,no noticeable damage or hammer marks. I’m thinking that the filler coats will blend everything smooth.
    Thanks again for the info. I really appreciate the opportunity to run these things past someone with experience.
    Tony
     
  7. OP
    OP
    thechief

    thechief Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Hi Tony, I'm a novice but am fairly well read plus I'm a retired house painter of 30 years. The lincead oil turpentine mix is applied liberally to the bare hull inside and out , obviously after the canvas has been removed and the interior has been stripped. Its the very 1st thing I do.This just feeds the old dry wood nothing else. The mixture gets sucked right in. Any sanding, staining or varnishing can be done after. If I replace any planking I do my best to match it up before putting it on the hull. Also I use a marine spar varnish that is a butterscotch color it helps the different shades of the planking blend better. I'm at that stage now. My canoe is freshly filled and when my hands recover I'll be varnishing the interior with satin spar varnish. It's natural in my opinion that there be some variation of planking color. You may get conflicting opinions regarding staining. I'm sure you could use some stain. Get a rag soaked with thinners that will give you a better idea of what any finish might look like color wise. Some folks thin the 1st coat of varnish with thinners not me unless it's cold and the varnish is moving smoothly. The color is a personal choice just like paint.
     
  8. Tony Muer

    Tony Muer Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Thanks chief for the input. What do you think of fairing the hull before canvas? Is that needed or not? I thought I had read something about this procedure and then cleaning out any compound from between any gaps in the planking and sanding
     
  9. OP
    OP
    thechief

    thechief Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    I've been reading many threads on am learning that the methods of restoring a wood canoe vary quite a bit. Having only restoring 2 old towns both vintage. I have lived on this lake on and off now permanently for 61 years. 36 homes. I've picked and salvaged 3 others maybe 4 but my experience is limited. Fairing compound is brand new to me. I do have some I plan on using it on the filled hull to shape the sponson ends . Again I think we're talking about personal preference unless you have some wide gaps. keep asking here i hope you get more feedback
    personally it's an antique small imperfections cosmetically add character .
     
  10. Tony Muer

    Tony Muer Curious about Wooden Canoes

    I agree with you on the fairing. At 80 years of age she entitled to a few imperfections. As long nothing else needs to be applyed on the hull but the linseed mix I’ll proceed with canvassing. Thanks chief .
     
  11. MGC

    MGC Paddlephile

    Just to add some alternative thoughts here...
    I only use "boat soup" on the outside of the canoe...never the inside. The inside gets multiple coats of high quality varnish....Rushton occasionally used shellac as a first coat and I've done that on Rushtons..the shellac soaks in quickly and gives a bit of color to the wood. Generally when using spar on the inside I thin the first few coats and then follow with 5 or six coats of varnish. I use a good quality gloss varnish and often finish with satin over the gloss. The satin typically does not offer as much UV protection but makes the boat look less "worked".
    If you are going to paint the outside of the hull with a turp/linseed oil mixture be sure to heat it before you apply it. If you search older threads here you will find some recipes that are used by other restorers... I blend linseed oil, turpentine and mineral spirits and carefully bring it to a near boil before I use it. I have heard of folks adding varnish but I do not. I want the oil to penetrate and then "set up" ...which the mix I use does. The mix of oil and turpentine without heating it is one I have used on old furniture and it's often used by folks that restore antiques...
    The hull can be faired. or not. It's your call. Does it need it? How smooth is it and how smooth do you want it to be? The canvas and filler will mask quite a few imperfections but they will not hide a planking seam that stands proud. Fairing is not always filling. It is often just sanding, or sanding and micro planing or filling, sanding and planing.. What is required depends on the condition of your hull. If you choose to use a faring compound be really careful how you use it. It can be as hard as nails and hard to remove if you use too much or get it jammed between the planks. You need to be very careful sanding down the fairing compound. The adjoining cedar is very soft and easily damaged if you sand too widely.
    WRT stains...usually hulls are not stained...except perhaps to match new wood to old where you have replaced ribs or planks. It's a real art to get it right.
    The stain exception are Morris canoes. Morris did stain to get color match in the mahogany he used. You can read about Morris canoes here on this site. There is a stain blend provided that you might try on a Morris.
    Try searching this site for more information. These are topics that have been hashed over quite often and responded to by many very experienced members, far more experienced than me. Good luck....
     
    Mark747 likes this.
  12. Tony Muer

    Tony Muer Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Thank you so much for your thoughts. I will use your info on my project .
    This forum is unbelievably helpful and I will search other treads as I’m sure more questions will arise.
     
  13. MGC

    MGC Paddlephile

    I should have added a caution about heating up the oil/turp/pirits mixture. Be careful. This stuff could become flammable....I know that folks would cringe to learn that I heat it in a can over my Coleman stove, but hey, I know someone that keeps the can sitting on the top of his wood stove.... Seriously, be careful when you heat it. Lowes sell empty paint cans with lids...make up a batch and store it for future use.
    Don't use straight linseed oil...it blackens and grows mold...
     
  14. Greg Nolan

    Greg Nolan enthusiast

    Using a double boiler would be a much, much safer way to heat this kind of thing up.
     

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