Recipe?

Gary

Canoe Grampa
Hi, my apologies I'm sure this is posted somewhere here but my search has come up empty. I read recently in a post about someone mentioning "giving a canoe a soak in Gregory Burke's recipe"? I'm hoping to get going on two restorations soon a Peterborough and a Chestnut and want to freshen up the interiors. I'm looking for alternatives to my process of stripping, washing with tsp, sanding, bleaching, and staining if required and was wondering about trying this recipe?
If anyone knows what this refers to and can pass it along I'd appreciate it.
Thanks, Gary
 

Benson Gray

Canoe History Enthusiast
Staff member
See the link below for the full video of Geoffrey Burke's presentation on this topic at the last Assembly.

Benson



 

Blott

LOVES Wooden Canoes
That was me! I gave my 1900 Peterborough Cedar Rib a good sloshing of Geoffrey Burkes “ boat soup” . The canoe has always leaked the amount dictated by the humidity. Following the treatment which was 3 sloshings, I can report that we are leak free so far and I have dry knees. 1 part Tung oil, 1 part boiled linseed oil, 1 part oil based varnish and 3 parts white spirit.

Mix well, rub all old with old cloths and dry the cloths flat outside eels you will be on first name terms with the loss adjuster for your property insurance.

Nick

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Gary

Gary

Canoe Grampa
Thank you Benson and Nick, looks like I'm still using the old tried and true method as this is for a different purpose than I'd thought, but still very useful!
Thanks again, Gary
 

MGC

Scrapmaker
I think you are searching for a recipe for the outside of the hull.
There are many threads on this site that have covered that.
Some folks apply varnish. Some folks use tung oil. Rollin has been using heated linseed oil for a long while.
I apply a heated blend of 70% linseed oil, 15% turpentine and 15% mineral spirits on the outside of my hulls before I canvas. I apply one coat, let it dry and then apply a second coat before after it absorbs and dries.
Here is one such thread:Rollin wins the battle | WCHA Forums
The Burke "soup" is for leaky cedar strips or wooden clinched hulls.
 
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Gary

Gary

Canoe Grampa
Thanks but no I was hoping for an easier solution to getting the inside of the canoe, ribs and planking looking newer. I use linseed oil and then varnish the exterior of the hull before re-canvasing.
 

Michael Grace

Lifetime Member
There really isn't anything that you can just slosh around in canoe's worn interior that will make it look new again. But you may not need to go through all the steps from stripping to cleaning , sanding and varnishing (skip the stain in any case!). If the canoe is just showing signs of worn varnish, just give the interior and trim a good sanding starting with P120 or even P150 and going to P220, then give two or more coats of varnish. It should look great and will be better protected.
 
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MGC

Scrapmaker
The easiest way is to have someone else do the work for you.
If as new is the goal, there are no shortcuts. How much work you need to do also depends upon the condition of the hull. If it's been painted on the inside, hope that there was good varnish under the paint.
As Michael and Dave have noted, wash, strip, TSP (or dish soap), Teak-Nu, sand, sand, sand, thinned varnish and followed by more varnish. There are no shortcuts. If you are ok with just laying on some fresh varnish, follow Michael's directions.
 
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Gary

Gary

Canoe Grampa
Thanks everyone I am very familiar with the process having restored a number of wood canoes but as I age I was looking for an alternative to all the hard work. Although this part is my least favorite I must admit it brings about the greatest satisfaction. So I guess it's true that some of our most pleasing things in life are those we had to work for. Time to roll up the shirt sleeves and get at it!
Happy canoeing, Gary
 

dtdcanoes

LOVES Wooden Canoes
Gary, all true what you say and the age thing really does rationalize the issue when it sometimes takes a lot longer than before. I found when I retired it seemed easier on the psyche when it mattered the most to get it right, period . And I think someone should name their next born Snappy Teak.
Dave
 
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