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Question Regarding Paint/Filler Impact Blems Below the Waterline

Discussion in 'Wood and Canvas' started by hopkintoncedar, Oct 18, 2021.

  1. hopkintoncedar

    hopkintoncedar LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Good Afternoon, what's the latest fix for deep scratches/gouges in the paint and filler stopping at the canvase weave below the waterline, just acquired a fine example of the 20 foot White/Stelmock guide boat and want to work on imperfections over the course of the winter so its correctly repaired, waterproof and ready for Northwoods action in May, pics to follow, thanks in advance, Todd
     
  2. paddler123

    paddler123 Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    The traditional(ish) material to use would be Ambroid glue, now discontinued. Duco Cement is supposed to be a good substitute. If the canvas is still intact but the filler is worn through, then you don't need a cloth patch but you put a little glue over/in the scratch to make it waterproof again. Once you've done all of the scratches, you can give it another coat of paint, but that's primarily for aesthetics.
     
  3. Dave Osborn

    Dave Osborn LIFE MEMBER

    I’ve used a Jamestown product to fill in gouges that are down to the canvas. It’s called Total Fair. Two part fairing compound. Sands easy and is tough as nails. I use a soft plastic spreader to apply it.
     
    David Satter likes this.
  4. OP
    OP
    hopkintoncedar

    hopkintoncedar LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Here are some pics of the deep scratches.......
     

    Attached Files:

  5. pklonowski

    pklonowski Unrepentant Canoeist

    Looks like there might be some damage to the fabric itself, possibly all the way through to the wood... if that's the case, you'll need to patch them.
     
  6. Dave Osborn

    Dave Osborn LIFE MEMBER

    Sorry I don’t have any photos of a recent repair of similar consequence, but those look exactly like the gouges that I filled in with Total Fair from Jamestown Distributors. There was some minor break through of canvas to the wood, but not bad enough that the Total Fair couldn’t do its job.
     
  7. Mud Bug

    Mud Bug Hand made things are better

    What about that plastic body filler stuff that comes in a tube? I recently was put onto that stuff for filling the aging cracks that canvas gets. Worked great for me. It dries fast--as in half an hour in the summer--then just sand it down and paint. Don't know why it wouldn't work for gouges too. Can't recollect the name of the stuff at the moment, but I've got a tube in the barn if you're curious.

    One time a long while back I tore a canvas and was in a pinch, and I just used JB Weld to fix it. Worked fine, and it lasted the life of the canvas. I glued it right to the wood, but there'd be no reason not to slip a bit of canvas in behind the cut. The stuff sands well and paints fine. Worked for me.
     
  8. Greg Nolan

    Greg Nolan enthusiast

    Bondo glazing and spot putty (one part, come in a tube, not the 2-part stuff used for filling filling dents in cars) is good for filling scratches and gouges in paint and filler, even ones that expose canvas -- dries fast, sands easily, and holds paint well. But it is not a glue -- I would not use it if the canvas is actually cut or torn. Comes in small and large tubes.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. OP
    OP
    hopkintoncedar

    hopkintoncedar LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Research suggests that a marine below the waterline epoxy repair putty might be a reasonable modern fix, bringing both adhesion and filling elements to the repair, maybe like this stuff????
     

    Attached Files:

  10. Mud Bug

    Mud Bug Hand made things are better

    Gosh, they even use the same colours as JB Weld.
     

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