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Old Town Whitecap sailbot

Discussion in 'Traditional All-Wood Construction' started by Steveike, May 5, 2012.

  1. Steveike

    Steveike New Member

    Hi all, 1st. time user. But looking for info on an Old Town Whitecap sailboat that I picked up last Aug.
    But just getting around to it. I have'nt been able to locate ser,# anyone with info? would be appreciated.
     
  2. Benson Gray

    Benson Gray Canoe History Enthusiast Staff Member

    The serial number should be on the inside stem but the mast step occasionally gets placed over it on small sailing boats like the Whitecap. You will need to crawl under the deck and look ahead of the centerboard trunk. It should also be located on the top edge of the transom or on the top edge of the brace that connects the transom to the keelson (which may be under the rear seat). The information at http://forums.wcha.org/showthread.php?791 might help. Please reply here if this isn't clear.

    Benson
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2012
  3. OP
    OP
    Steveike

    Steveike New Member

    Thanks for the reply. I'm almost ready to bring her in the shop to start overhaul. ... Steve
     
  4. Gil Cramer

    Gil Cramer The wooden canoe Shop, Inc.

    Steveike,
    Most likely the ribs and keelson are ash. Unless the boat has been stored a lot more than used, they have some serious rot. Replacing the keelson around the centerboard trunk is a WONDERFUL experience. Otherwise; they are a great little boat- even crossed the Atlantic -solo.
     
  5. knubud

    knubud Wooden Canoeist

    Steve - we also have a Whitecap that we are restoring. No rot issues but split planks are the main problem.

    LAter-Bud
     
  6. JaguarJim

    JaguarJim New Member

    Floor boards for Old Town Whitecap

    I'm in the midst of restoring a Whitecap that did have some serious rot, cracked planks and broken ribs. It did not have any floor boards when I got it, but have seen photos of others showing them. My plans are to use white oak and build "sections" that can be removed to allow access beneath them. Does anyone know if this was the original design, and what thickness might be appropriate? My thoughts are between 3/8 and 1/2 inch thick, but don't want to add extra weight if not needed that thick.
     
  7. Benson Gray

    Benson Gray Canoe History Enthusiast Staff Member

    The pictures at http://forums.wcha.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=243&d=1110167997 and http://forums.wcha.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=2093&d=1159923510 show some of the floor racks in a Whitecap. I believe that they were originally made in sections so they could be removed. Several Whitecap owners have posted messages here over the years so you may want to search for their messages and contact them directly. Good luck and please reply hear if you don't get the answer you need. Thanks,

    Benson
     
  8. JaguarJim

    JaguarJim New Member

    Benson,

    Thanks for the reply. I've seen copies of the pictures which is the reason I want to add the floor boards. I'm still hoping that someone will have the information re. thickness. Already replaced the inner and outer stems, several of the ribs, the centerboard and rudder. Stems and ribs are epoxy laminated oak while the CB and rudder are mahogany.

    Jim
     
  9. Benson Gray

    Benson Gray Canoe History Enthusiast Staff Member

    I was able to look at a similar sailing dinghy that was designed and shipped to John Alden after being made by the Old Town Canoe company in 1931. The floor boards in this boat are about a half inch thick. I have attached some pictures of their construction which may help you with some ideas of how to make the ones for your Whitecap. More information is available at http://forums.wcha.org/showthread.php?3988 about the Alden.

    Benson
     

    Attached Files:

  10. Benson Gray

    Benson Gray Canoe History Enthusiast Staff Member

    Some additional images of the floor racks in place are attached below. An image of Alden's original plans for the floor rack in this boat design number 512 are also attached. It is interesting to note that the original plans do not show exactly how these were actually built which is not unusual. A portion from a later Alden plan number 540 for a different Old Town sailing dinghy are also attached. This shows the floor boards along the curve of the hull instead of being parallel to the waterline like the ones in the design number 512. I don't know which of these two styles was originally used in the Whitecap. Good luck,

    Benson
     

    Attached Files:

  11. JaguarJim

    JaguarJim New Member

    Benson,

    Great pictures. Thanks for them. I've got what I need to start this part of the process. I'm going with the design keeping the boards parallel to the waterline. Looks more like what earlier pics of the actual Whitecap boards.

    Jim
     
  12. Benson Gray

    Benson Gray Canoe History Enthusiast Staff Member

    Last edited: Sep 4, 2012
  13. JaguarJim

    JaguarJim New Member

    Benson,

    Thanks for link to craigslist boat. I've printed pics for comparison. We've started our floor boards using 3/4 inch white oak for the "joists" parallel to the ribs and 1/2 inch white oak for the boards. We're shaping the outboard-most board to the curvature of the hull, then using 3.25 inch widths over to the keel and trunk. Leaving about a 1/4 inch spacing. We'll run from the transom to the front of the centerboard trunk where the coaming and deck cover the rest of the ribs and planks. Planning on 4 sections. I'll send pictures as we get them assembled.

    Jim
     
  14. chris pearson

    chris pearson Michigan Canoe Nut

    Man thats a sweet boat, price doesn't seem bad either.....
     

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