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Keeping Your Canoe In The Water

Discussion in 'Wood and Canvas' started by David Satter, Mar 26, 2018.

  1. David Satter

    David Satter LOVES Wooden Canoes

    I have a few customers who insist on keeping their canoe (heavy square sterns) in the water for weeks at a time. Because they use them almost daily. Not in the rain. I don't really think it's a great idea. I'd love to hear some other opinions for or against this. So far not to many problems. their finished with traditional filler , primed and three coats marine enamel. Thanks, Dave
     
  2. Todd Bradshaw

    Todd Bradshaw Sailmaker

    It says right on the can of most marine enamels that they are not designed for continuous immersion. Many of them will peel if you leave a boat in the water more than just a few days. A weekend - you're usually safe. More than that though, you're taking your chances. I'd be kind of surprised if filler would be a whole lot different, as it's made from similar stuff.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    David Satter

    David Satter LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Todd, your right, I should now that I've been doing this long enough. you don't think of that I'm used to people taking the canoe in and out . I'm really painting with Topside paint like Epifanes and brightside . I have done a few with freshwater bottom paint. Maybe I should talk the customers into a true bottom paint if their thinking of leaving it in the water.
     
  4. Gil Cramer

    Gil Cramer The wooden canoe Shop, Inc.

    Years ago, one of my customer's canoes was left in the water for weeks. The lake was in upstate NY and was slightly acidic. All of the paint below the waterline was gone-no trace whatsoever. The white lead based filler was fine. This was a quality marine enamel.
     
  5. MGC

    MGC Paddlephile

    What an interesting way to find the exact waterline!
    After the paint is etches away you know exactly where to apply shellac.
     
  6. Andre Cloutier

    Andre Cloutier Firestarter. Wicked Firestarter.

    What an interesting way to find the exact waterline!
    After the paint is etches away you know exactly where to apply shellac
    .

    Always pragmatic, you are. lol

    The two part polyurethanes are great - never used one yet on a traditionally filled boat. I know they recommend against it, but it has performed great in the past, most notably during collisions with my 16/30. And being left in the water of course.
     

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