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It's Official - my '51 OTCA project

Discussion in 'Wood and Canvas' started by mmmalmberg, Nov 25, 2019.

  1. mmmalmberg

    mmmalmberg Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    I have bit the bullet and decided to restore this boat myself - my first boat project. I was going to send it off for someone more experienced but I know I can do it and I know it will be worth it. This afternoon I removed the gunnels so it's official:)

    I'll follow progress, however slow, in this thread.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. OP
    OP
    mmmalmberg

    mmmalmberg Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    And I did my first repair:)
     

    Attached Files:

  3. OP
    OP
    mmmalmberg

    mmmalmberg Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    AND met a new friend. Although, I'm not sure he's all that friendly:) Stowaway from South Carolina.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Nov 26, 2019
  4. Dave Osborn

    Dave Osborn LIFE MEMBER

    We are here for ya....
     
  5. OP
    OP
    mmmalmberg

    mmmalmberg Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Thanks Dave and I'm counting on it:)

    (and grateful!)
     
  6. Ron Bedard

    Ron Bedard Curious about Wooden Canoes

    You'll enjoy it! Best of luck.
    Ron
     
    mmmalmberg likes this.
  7. MGC

    MGC Paddlephile

    And so it begins...
    Make sure that if you are gluing and using a "regular" glue that you are using Titebond 3, not TB 2. The TB 3 is more water resistant than 2.
     
    mmmalmberg likes this.
  8. monkitoucher

    monkitoucher Canoe Curious

    mmmalmberg likes this.
  9. OP
    OP
    mmmalmberg

    mmmalmberg Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Thanks for the links - I'll get them ordered. Generally I plan to leave the planks on the ribs:)

    One question already is how carefully do I need to store the long pieces like the gunnels and keel, are they likely to warp if I don't create some sort of perfect support for them through maybe sometime in the summer?
     
  10. OP
    OP
    mmmalmberg

    mmmalmberg Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    BTW nothing new but if you didn't see the "before" pics they're here: http://www.markmalmberg.com/canoe
    I'll make another page at some point for in-process pics.
     
  11. OP
    OP
    mmmalmberg

    mmmalmberg Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Well too late for that first one but I'll double-check what I have.
    Speaking of glues, my dad used resorcinol for gluing wood splices etc. on his own sailboat. That stuff seemed great, is that in common use still?
     
  12. Dave Wermuth

    Dave Wermuth Who hid my paddle?

    I don't think so. Newer adhesives have come on the scene.
     
  13. OP
    OP
    mmmalmberg

    mmmalmberg Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    What would be a new adhesive outperforming resorcinol? Thanks:)
     
  14. Fitz

    Fitz Wooden Canoes are in the Blood

    I like epoxy, or epoxy thickened with colloidal silica. Tightbond 3 too.
     
    mmmalmberg likes this.
  15. mccloud

    mccloud Wooden Canoe Maniac

    I've heard good reports about G-Flex epoxy, remains more flexible when set than standard epoxies. TM..
     
    mmmalmberg likes this.
  16. MGC

    MGC Paddlephile

    I use the G-flex on almost everything...I recently repaired the fiberglass fender/headlamp assembly of an older Freightliner (held it in place so that I could use glass and then bondo), my gore tex North Face boots were held together by it until there was more g-flex than boot, I repaired a cracked stock on an old Remington and of course I use it on canoes..stems, rails, rib tips, thwart and seat repairs...etc. It's great stuff. The one thing that users need to consider is that it does not penetrate tightly grained hard woods very well (at all). So, to get the best joint performance be sure to make really nice long splices. Little shorty one inch splices are likely to fail. Once the stuff hardens it is very impact resistant, one of it's major benefits. It hardens slowly. That gives you lot's of working time for clamping/fixturing. When you use G-Flex you are not in a race to get your work done before it sets. I do not use "standard" epoxies on anything anymore...
     
    mmmalmberg likes this.
  17. OP
    OP
    mmmalmberg

    mmmalmberg Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Pulling the seats out, the diamond-head bolts are pretty tightly held by the wood of the inwales as well as the wood of the seat itself. The front seat I was able to get started with a few taps of a rubber mallet, and then backing the screws out. The aft seat is not budging and I don't want to break anything. Any tips? I imagine the wood has shrunk over time so that what were once clearance holes are now tightly threaded.

    I've thought about heating the bolts enough to expand a bit to maybe compress the wood a bit. A bit hotter and I could char the wood a bit but could easily soften or damage the metal. I'm not sure either is a good idea:)
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2019
  18. MGC

    MGC Paddlephile

    Discussed at length here:http://www.wcha.org/forums/index.php?threads/o-t-diamond-head-bolts.16556/#post-84367
    I thread a couple nuts on the ends of the thread to protect the threads and then give em a whack with a brass hammer..the rubber mallet doesn't usually do the job. The diamond heads are embedded into the rail so you need to get them free to get the seats (and thwarts) free. The attached thread gives you many other ways to tackle this.
     
    mmmalmberg likes this.
  19. OP
    OP
    mmmalmberg

    mmmalmberg Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Oh yeah I tried that too. I could try harder though:) Thanks for the link, headed there now...
     
  20. OP
    OP
    mmmalmberg

    mmmalmberg Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    OK Thanks again for the link. I'm going to make a little press as described, that seems much more gentle and controlled than hitting harder:)
     

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