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Information needed on my grandfather's old canoe

Discussion in 'Wood and Canvas' started by bribjork, Jul 13, 2013.

  1. bribjork

    bribjork Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Hello, I inherited my grandfather's old canoe back in 2004 when he passed away. I've been told it's an Old Town from the early 1900's (I'm going to double check with my uncle on this). He salvaged it from someone and stripped the canvas off it, probably in the 1960s, and refinished it with fiberglass. I scoured it for serial numbers or any other identifying marks, but found none. The canoe is just about 16-ft long, and roughly 13-ft between the two highest points. It is ~31" at the widest point, and ~13 3/4" high at the highest point in the center. I've included a few pictures that may be of some help. Any information would really be appreciated. I am trying to figure out what to do with it as I simply do not have the room for it at my house and already have another newer canoe and a kayak. The canoe was used ALOT by my gramps and uncle, for days at a time. My grandfather often used it with a sail and trolling motor. He constructed a trolling motor mount, sail mount, and 'fiberboard' seats.

    As I get more info from my uncle I will post it.

    Thank you for any information!!

    Brian
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jul 13, 2013
  2. OP
    OP
    bribjork

    bribjork Curious about Wooden Canoes

    I took a picture of one of the decks (3rd above) in hopes that the design cut in to it is unique to a maker....

    Thanks again
     
  3. smallboatshop

    smallboatshop Restorers

  4. Jan Bloom

    Jan Bloom LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Length is not measured high point to high point but the longest distance bow to stern. In other words from the farthest points on the curves of the bow and stem. The decks are not Old Town style decks.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    bribjork

    bribjork Curious about Wooden Canoes

    The canoe is 16-ft at the longest point. When I was measuring I was just trying to take every measurement that could be useful. haha.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    bribjork

    bribjork Curious about Wooden Canoes

  7. OP
    OP
    bribjork

    bribjork Curious about Wooden Canoes

    It also appears the thwarts and yoke have been replaced at some point...
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2013
  8. H.E. Pennypacker

    H.E. Pennypacker LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Brian,

    Yes, your canoe is likely Kingsbury, who operated in MA up into the 40s. Several features indicate so - deck cutout, un-tapered ribs, chamfered edges of the ends of the inside stems - plus you're right there in Kingsbury country. Here is a thread with a lot of good information:

    http://forums.wcha.org/showthread.php?1809-Canoe-Identification-Help&p=8043#post8043

    Yes, thwarts are replaced and fiberglass can be a real pain, plus outside stems are missing, and the inside is painted. But overall your canoe is still there. Worth restoration IMHO.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    bribjork

    bribjork Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Thank you for the information! Before today I had never even heard of Kingsbury canoes. I'd really like to get the canoe to someone who will appreciate it and restore it back to what it once used to be. I would love to keep it but I just don't have the place to store it or the money to restore it. Also, what would a canoe like this be worth? I haven't found much information (besides the link in the post above) about Kingsbury canoes online.

    Thanks again!
     
  10. Dave Wermuth

    Dave Wermuth Who hid my paddle?

    To update: I am now the owner of this canoe, having acquired it from Ken Kelly. My wife and I removed the 'glass covering for Ken while it was his and we liked the canoe a lot. Ken decided he didn't need it as he already has one, so he offered us first right of refusal and we just couldn't refuse. At that point through the graciousness of Craig Kitchen, Craig took it from my house in Lapeer, Mi to Wisconsin by way of Marquette where it got all the paint stripped from the inside by a professional paint stripper, the same one Dave Osborn uses. Craig, or I should say Judy, cartopped it back to Saginaw Michigan where I met her and retrieved it home. It sat on the rack for a year or two while other projects needed to be done. A few weeks ago got it on the sawhorses. The two broken ribs have backside rib repairs with an inside thin lamination to cover the screw holes. The stem tips are being addressed and of course the motor mount is gone. I am also plugging all the extra holes in the inwales. I could use photos of thwarts and seats as the originals are gone. And I am also searching for any history of the company. bribjork, feel free to contact me directly. I soaked it in the pond prior to removing the 'glass. in pond2.png 8.12.19.jpg And that's the news from the kingdom of derelict canoe whisperings.
     

    Attached Files:

  11. Rob Stevens

    Rob Stevens Wooden Canoes are in the Blood

    Love the photo of the submarine canoe!
     
  12. Fitz

    Fitz Wooden Canoes are in the Blood

    I am not sure, but I think the motor mount might be kicking around in my garage if you really want it. There is a good chance I disposed of it properly though.
     
  13. monkitoucher

    monkitoucher Canoe Curious

  14. Dave Wermuth

    Dave Wermuth Who hid my paddle?

    The bracket for the motor mount was still attached, if you want it I can scrounge around to see if I still have it...…..
     

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