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Discussion in 'Traditional All-Wood Construction' started by jchu, Mar 12, 2005.

  1. jchu

    jchu LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Heres what I've come up with to get this Peterborough #4 back in the water. The hull was toast with some big holes and a very long crack. Not accounting for years of grinding and sanding the ribs to nothing.. On to my next mold build so its not an easy job but getting it done right.

    OK heres the pictures back. Its a fiberglass epoxy mold poured between each keelson with mounting blocks set in. You can only pour one piece at a time. First taping it off with aluminum tape, then waxing it with mold release. Assemble it in the canoe, scribe how it fits, take apart and assemble outside. Router bits are not that big of problem.

    Cheers,
    Jeff
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 20, 2005
  2. Darryl

    Darryl Canoe Nut

    Looks great Jeff, I commend you on taking the time to do it right.
    Couple of questions:
    • Did the tongues fit into the grooves while the wood was wet? I always assumed that they wouldn't fit properly until they dried a bit.
    • Did any pieces break while bending? Did you find that any part of the strips had to be treated more delicately than others?
    • I noticed that the end of the strips are being held in place by a solid peice of wood. How did you fit the strip under that holder while bending?
    • Did you find that the strips wanted to lift at the keel line? Just curious on the use of the hold down at that location
    Thanks, and good luck with the rest of it. It will be well worth the effort in the end.

    Darryl
     
  3. OP
    OP
    jchu

    jchu LOVES Wooden Canoes

    [*]Did the tongues fit into the grooves while the wood was wet? I always assumed that they wouldn't fit properly until they dried a bit.

    >They could have but where a little swollen. Even when dry it takes good clamping to get tight.

    [*]Did any pieces break while bending? Did you find that any part of the strips had to be treated more delicately than others?

    >I broke a few. Had a few wrinkle on inside of chine area.

    [*]I noticed that the end of the strips are being held in place by a solid peice of wood. How did you fit the strip under that holder while bending?

    >When I pull the ribs out of the steamer I slide down in that piece and start the bend. The other side came off and was hurriedly put on after finished. Had a set up for other side when bending a new one for multiple ribs.

    [*]Did you find that the strips wanted to lift at the keel line? Just curious on the use of the hold down at that location

    > I was afraid they would but no they never really did. Once bent around the mold they held snug.
     
  4. dboles

    dboles LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Hello Jeff
    I remember your initial post about this subject.Seems you are right on track with the restoration.
    Some questions if you do not mind
    Wherever did you find the canoe,seems in rough shape any history of the canoe you know about.
    What needs to be done to get it in the water and will it be this summer?
    Is there any bedding compound between the seams or was there originally.
    I would imagine there to be battens on the inside when finished or is the canoe all held together by the outwales/inwales
    Anymore pictures
    Great work so far
    Thanks
    Daniel
     
  5. OP
    OP
    jchu

    jchu LOVES Wooden Canoes

    >Wherever did you find the canoe,seems in rough shape any history of the canoe you know about.
    When I was 16 in 1976 I found it setting on a pair of saw horses with a for sale sign on it way out in the middle of nowhere in Northern IL. about 20 miles south of the WI border. The farmer wanted 35 bucks for it and my friend and I only had 24 between us. Floated it a few times down the Rock River and then it hung in my fathers garage untill he passed away in 97. Then it came to CO. Before that I know nothing. By serial # placement it seems to have been built between 1909 and 1920.
    >What needs to be done to get it in the water and will it be this summer?
    All the hull will be replaced, new decking and trim, one keelson, the bottom keel piece, oak trim on inside of gunwales, maybe gunwales. This summer? It's hard to tell at this point. Very possible.
    >Is there any bedding compound between the seams or was there originally.
    I was curious about that myself. I researched it for 6 months before I did anything. I met a super guy out here named Jack. He has been very helpful and encouraging, supplying all the information on how it was built, giving me tips on how to go about it, also information from people who built them. Has made replicas of the missing mast ring and cup as well. Who would ever think you could get one of those. Everthing will be done according to how it came from the factory and mine had lots of varnish goobered in the tongue and groove.

    >I would imagine there to be battens on the inside when finished or is the canoe all held together by the outwales/inwales
    Yes it has keelsons that run from end to end. You can probably find a picture on the net showing them.
    >Anymore pictures
    I am not a member of the WCHA. I plan on if I get this finished. I don't want to be a bandwidth hog with this wonderful forum. I will delete these pics and post more as they come.

    Glad you guys are interested. I am really into it and hope someone can find another they will restore.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2008
  6. Mark Reuten

    Mark Reuten Wood Butcher

    Don't go deleting those pictures. They are a real asset to the next poor bugger who is trying to pull off the same repair. These discussion groups are one of the best research tools out there and a little more bandwidth use is a small price to pay for valuable information. Just control the size of your images if you are concerned. By all means, join the club. you dont have to finish your repair to be eligable.
    I have to commend you on your efforts so far. You've taken on an extremely tricky project and appear to be progressing nicely. Those canoe were notoriosly difficult to build in the first place.
     
  7. MikeCav

    MikeCav Restorer/Videographer

    I'll second Mark's comments. Keep up the good work and please join WCHA. You will find a welcoming community full of great people - and it goes much deeper than a few splinters of cedar!
     

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