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Finishing

Discussion in 'Wood and Canvas' started by chipfitzgerald, Mar 24, 2018.

  1. chipfitzgerald

    chipfitzgerald Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Need some advice from the experts. So... I'm ready to apply new canvas and finish the inside of my OT Charles River 17 and I've got a few questions.

    1. Which should I do first? Shall I apply the new canvas, seal, and paint it first or should I finish the interior first?

    2. When finishing the interior, the material I'm reading on-line and in books talks of treating the wood with linseed oil, then applying shellac, and then applying the spar varnish. The problem I have is that I'm working in my garage, which is heated, but the fumes permeate into the house. Are there other alternatives that are less odorless that work just as well?
     
  2. 1905Gerrish

    1905Gerrish LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Chip,
    Always finish the inside first. Yes, oil the canoe inside and outside. I skip the shellac and go to the epifanes varnish. I use tung oil and mineral spirts. 50/50. Unfortunately the fumes are a must with the common products most of us use. I have the same issue but you get used to it after 25 years. The first few hours are the worst. Never gotten sick before but the old lady complains a bit.
     
  3. pklonowski

    pklonowski Unrepentant Canoeist

    You might consider weather stripping the door to the garage better, and/or putting a wet towel on the floor, across the bottom of the door. That might keep the fumes outside a bit better...
     
  4. Howie

    Howie LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Hi. Just to weigh in and add to the above... Consider this: if the canvas is still 'there' consider leaving it in place until after the interior has been stripped & cleaned. Leaving the canvas in place helps conserve the stripping goop and keeps your floor cleaner. I also clean & bleach the wood after stripping (I use Messner's 2-part system) and having the canvas in place really helps keep these chemicals in contact with the wood longer thus making the process more effective. After all this remove the canvas and let the outside dry thoroughly as the canvas kept the wood very wet. Then fix any wood problems, then varnish the interior, then slap on some 50/50 linseed & thinner. Then recanvas. At least, that's the way I do it.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    chipfitzgerald

    chipfitzgerald Curious about Wooden Canoes

    I'll keep those tips in mind for the next project. This is a new build using an original OT Charles River 17 as the mold. For next project I plan on restoring the original canoe used as the mold for the new build and giving it to my bother.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    chipfitzgerald

    chipfitzgerald Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Thank you for the tips. How long should I wait to apply the varnish after applying the oil and mineral spirits? Does tung oil have any benefits over linseed oil or visa-versa?
     
  7. OP
    OP
    chipfitzgerald

    chipfitzgerald Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Yes, I thought of of that. I also think I'm going to install a high CFM exhaust fan to keep the garage under a negative pressure so the fumes are vented outside.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    chipfitzgerald

    chipfitzgerald Curious about Wooden Canoes

    How long should I wait to apply the varnish after applying the oil and mineral spirits? Does tung oil have any benefits over linseed oil or visa-versa?
     
  9. rbudge

    rbudge Curious about Wooden Canoes

    Linseed oil should be avoided. Fungi seem to love the stuff when the humidity is high. I believe that applying linseed oil serves to negate the natural anti fungal properties of cedar. It will not prevent the wood from absorbing water as it is quite superficial (except on end grain). It seems pointless to me and possibly harmful.
     

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