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Brass Bow Strip-screws Stripped On My Stripper.

Discussion in 'Strippers, Stitch-n-Glue, and Other Wood Composite' started by Charles stone, May 17, 2018.

  1. Charles stone

    Charles stone New Member

    Hey everyone. Newb here. I have a 20 year old Kedros cedar strip canoe. Last season my daughter dropped the bow while unloading from car tearing the fiberglass cloth just beneath the brass protecting strip, causing the glass to separate a bit. Trying to remove the brass guard strip to cut away and Re glass this section however fine brass screws cannot be removed without being stripped. What to do.
     
  2. OP
    OP
    Charles stone

    Charles stone New Member

    Another question. Just recanned a seat and was wondering, is it better to varnish the cane seat or leave as natural. Seems varnishing makes it more brittle and likely to tear.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Charles stone

    Charles stone New Member

    And lastly, regarding the first problem, would it be better to cut a away the elevated glass and then just reglass up to the brass. Strip?
     
  4. OP
    OP
    Charles stone

    Charles stone New Member

    I have three posts now. Hope to here from someone.
     
  5. Dan Lindberg

    Dan Lindberg Rotten Wood Hoarder

    Pics of the break would be nice.

    The screw - if you can't remove it, you could drill off the head (very carefully) to remove the bang strip. Maybe if you are lucky, you will leave a small bit to get a vise-lock on to remove.
    Seat varnish - some do, some don't.

    Like to see the failed glass before offering an opinion.

    Dan
     
  6. pklonowski

    pklonowski Unrepentant Canoeist

    You may (may) be able to hold a hot soldering iron to the screw head, heating up the screw and softening the adhesive is holding the screw in place, then try to turn it with a screwdriver. Try to avoid scorching anything, and be gentle but firm when trying to turn it. And it may not work at all, leaving you with a headless screw. Good luck!
     
  7. samb

    samb LOVES Wooden Canoes

  8. Jim Dodd

    Jim Dodd LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Heating with a soldering iron is good, if you still have enough head to get a hold of.
    If not, I have used a specialty hollow drill bit, that drills around the screw.
    A tip, don't drill very deep ! Just enough to clamp a vise grip on the screw.

    The hole can be easily filled with thickened epoxy, then redrilled for a New screw .

    Good Luck !

    Jim
     
  9. Jim Dodd

    Jim Dodd LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Yes pics needed for the fiberglass repair !

    Jim
     
  10. Dave Wermuth

    Dave Wermuth Who hid my paddle?

    heating is helpful. I have also used an impact driver 12v If there is anything left of the screw head I have found the impact driver to be extraordinary in backing out screws.
     

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